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Can I make a browser cache an HTTP POST request?

Can I make a browser cache an HTTP POST request?

This shows that, even though you can set the Cache-Control and Content-Location response headers, there is no way to make a browser cache an HTTP POST request. Do I have to follow the RFC? [4]

Do I need to cache the HTTP response? In most cases you don't want to cache the response. But in some cases - such as if you are not saving any data on the server - it's entirely appropriate. Note, however many browsers, including current Firefox 3.0.10, will not cache POST response regardless of the headers. [4]

Consequently, How do I cache a POST request? Well, you're not caching the POST request, you're caching the resource. The POST response body can only be cached for subsequent GET requests to the same resource. Set the Location or Content-Location header in the POST response to communicate which resource the body represents. [4]

One may also ask, Is the response to a post message cacheable? Show activity on this post. The corresponding RFC 2616 in section 9.5 (POST) allows the caching of the response to a POST message, if you use the appropriate headers. Responses to this method are not cacheable, unless the response includes appropriate Cache-Control or Expires header fields. [4]

Herein, What is HTTP caching? HTTP caching is optional but usually desirable. HTTP caches are typically limited to caching responses to GET; they may decline other methods. The primary cache key consists of the request method and target URI (often only the URI is used — this is because only GET requests are caching targets). Common forms of caching entries are: [5]

Do I need to cache the HTTP response?

Do I need to cache the HTTP response?

Likewise, people ask, What is an HTTP response from cache? The HTTP specification allows a response from cache if one of the following is satisfied: The cached response is consistent with the origin server’s response, had the origin server handled the request – in short, the proxy can guarantee a semantic equivalence between the cached response and the origin server’s response. [1]

Subsequently, What does the Cache Store about the client request? The cache should not store anything about the client request or server response. A request is sent to the server and a full response is downloaded each and every time. A cache will send the request to the origin server for validation before releasing a cached copy. The "public" directive indicates that the response may be cached by any cache. [5]

What is the goal of caching HTTP? The goal of caching in HTTP/1.1 is to eliminate the need to send requests in many cases, and to eliminate the need to send full responses in many other cases. The basic cache mechanisms in HTTP/1.1 are implicit directives to caches where server-specifies expiration times and validators. [2]

Also, What is the purpose of the cache-control HTTP header? The Cache-Control HTTP/1.1 general-header field is used to specify directives for caching mechanisms in both requests and responses. Use this header to define your caching policies with the variety of directives it provides. The cache should not store anything about the client request or server response. [5]

How do I cache a POST request?

How do I cache a POST request?

Beside this, Why do I need to refresh the cache for each post? That said, each POST that hits the cache requires validation using conditional headers. This is required in order to refresh the cache content to avoid having the results of a POST not be reflected in the responses to requests until after the lifetime of the object expires. Show activity on this post. [4]

Similarly, What is the difference between get and post caching? But HTTP caching is applicable only to idempotent requests, which makes a lot of sense; only idempotent and nullipotent requests yield the same result when run multiple times. In the HTTP world, this fact means that GET requests can be cached but POST requests cannot. [1]

Likewise, Can I serve a POST request from the cache? Following GET's can be served from cache under this assumption. An application that fails to attach the necessary and correct headers to differentiate between cachable and non-cachable POST responses is at fault for any invalid caching results. That said, each POST that hits the cache requires validation using conditional headers. [4]

In this manner, How do I change the cache key of a POST request? The solution is to digest the POST body (along with a few headers), append the URL with the digest, and use this digest instead of just the URL as the cache key (see Figure 2). In other words, the cache key is modified to include the payload in addition to the URL. [1]

Is the response to a post message cacheable?

Is the response to a post message cacheable?

Similarly one may ask, What is a cacheable response? A cacheable response is an HTTP response that can be cached, that is stored to be retrieved and used later, saving a new request to the server. Not all HTTP responses can be cached, these are the following constraints for an HTTP response to be cached: [4]

Subsequently, Is the post method cacheable? 9.5 POST .. Responses to this method are not cacheable, unless the response includes appropriate Cache-Control or Expires header fields. However, the 303 (See Other) response can be used to direct the user agent to retrieve a cacheable resource. [4]

In this manner, Is there a way to cache the response to a post? The corresponding RFC 2616 in section 9.5 (POST) allows the caching of the response to a POST message, if you use the appropriate headers. Responses to this method are not cacheable, unless the response includes appropriate Cache-Control or Expires header fields. [4]

Keeping this in consideration, How do I make HTTP requests cacheable? POST requests are not cacheable by default but can be made cacheable if either an Expires header or a Cache-Control header with a directive, to explicitly allows caching, is added to the response. Responses to PUT and DELETE requests are not cacheable at all. There are two main HTTP response headers that we can use to control caching behavior: [8]

What is HTTP caching?

What is HTTP caching?

Accordingly, How to prevent caching in Internet Explorer?

  • Are you using the Cache-Control header with the ASP Response.CacheControl property or through a returned HTTP header? ...
  • Are you using Internet Explorer 4.01 Service Pack 2 or higher? ...
  • Have you double-checked that your web server has HTTP 1.1 turned on and is returning HTTP 1.1 responses to Internet Explorer? ...
[7]

Accordingly, How to prevent web browsers from caching? How to prevent web browsers from caching? Solution 1: While hitting the refresh web button of the browser, hold the Shift key (or press Shift+F5). This must tell the browser to fetch the page from the server even if the page is already in the browser's cache. For IE go to menu, click on Tools/ Internet options / Settings (at Temporary Internet ... [4]

Just so, What is caching and how it works?

  • Geocaching Pioneers. Like many technologies,GPS receivers inspired a community of enthusiasts and early adopters. ...
  • Geocache Basic Equipment. To find a cache,you'll first need the correct coordinates. ...
  • Additional Geocaching Equipment. ...
  • Find That Geocache. ...
  • Hiding a Geocache. ...
  • Geocaching Containers. ...
  • Caching In. ...
  • Cache Out. ...
[2]

Also Know, What is website caching and why is it so important? Website caching is one of the most useful technologies available in the world of web development. In short, it makes websites very fast, which leads to better SEO results and increased user satisfaction. This will directly gives better conversions and therefore increased income if you’re selling products or services online. In this article, we’ll tell ] [5]

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